Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Writing a Linear Equation from a Table - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to write a linear equation from a given table of values. In order to write the equation, you need to know the slope intercept form of a linear equation, which is y = mx + b, y and x being the values, m being the slope, and b being the y-intercept. The slope is always the rise over run, meaning you have to find the change in the y values (y-axis rises/falls), over the change in x values (x-axis left/right). Once you find the slope, you can substitute it into the y = mx + b, and take any coordinate to fill in the x and y variables. Then, you simply solve for b, which is the y-intercept. Once you have the slope and y-intercept, substitute into the slope intercept form, and you have your linear equation.






Graphing Absolute Value Functions - Agebra I

In this video, you will learn how to graph absolute value functions. Absolute value is the distance of an number from 0 in a number line. The absolute value of any number is always positive. When graphing absolute value functions, keep in mind that the graph will not be a straight line like in linear functions. Instead, the line will look curved and bent. Before you graph an absolute value function, it is important to find all the coordinates. In the chart shown in the video, the x values of six coordinates have been listed. As for the y values, there is a function given: y = Ix - 5I. In order to find the y values, you have to plug in the value of x into the function, and then find the absolute value of the answer that you get. Once you have all your values, graph them to get your final answer. Thanks for watching this video, and hit like and subscribe for more videos every week!






Direct Variation - Algebra I

Direct Variation - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn about direct variation. Direct variation is the relationship between two variables that is consistent. In most examples of direct variation, you will be given the values of the two variables, and asked to find the value of one of the variables, when the other variable equals a quantity. In order to find that value, you must use the formula for direct variation. The formula is y=kx, in which y and x are the two variables, and k is the constant of variation. The constant of variation is the ratio of variation between the two variables that is constant for all values. To find the constant of variation, substitute the values given for x and y into the formula. Once you have the constant of variation, substitute into the formula with the third given value to find its varying value. Thanks for watching this video, and please subscribe for weekly videos!









Slope and Rate of Change - Algebra I

Slope and Rate of Change

In this video, you will learn about slope and rate of change. There are four types of slope: positive (rising), negative(falling), zero slope, and no slope. In order to find the slope, take any two coordinates from a line and substitute the values of x and y of each coordinate into the formula. Rate of change is the relationship between the x and y values in the coordinates given. In order to find the rate of change, you need to know that the you are looking for the change of y over the change of x. Thanks for watching this video, and subscribe for more!






Sunday, December 20, 2015

Perimeter Word Problem Involving Variables - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to solve perimeter word problems involving variables. For example, if you have a rectangle, the formula for perimeter is 2L + 2W. Based on the measurements given, you will substitute into the formula to find the length and width.


Perimeter Word Problem Involving Variables - Algebra I

How to Convert Standard Form to Slope Intercept Form - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to rewrite an equation from standard form to slope intercept form. Standard form is ax+by=c in which a and b are coefficients and c is a constant. Slope intercept form is y=mx+b, in which m is the slope and b is the y-intercept. In order to rewrite an equation from standard form to slope intercept form, you have to solve for the value of y. Then, rewrite to have the equation in slope intercept form.



How to Convert Standard Form to Slope Intercept Form - Algebra I


How to Write an Equation of a Line when given Two Points - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to write an equation of a line when given two points. The first step is to write out the slope intercept form of a linear equation, which is y=mx+b. Remember that you are looking for the values of m and b, m being the slope and b being the y-intercept. To find the slope, use the slope formula. To find the y-intercept, use any of the given points and substitute into the slope intercept formula with the slope. Once you have both values, simply substitute into the slope intercept form and you have your equation. For more, subscribe and don't forget to hit like and leave a comment below!



How to Write an Equation of a Line when given Two Points - Algebra I

Introduction to Consecutive Integers - Algebra I

In this video, we will be doing an introduction to consecutive integers. Consecutive integers are integers that follow each other in a specified patterned order. This video will cover the basics of algebra I consecutive integers with four detailed step-by-step examples. Thanks for watching, and subscribe for much more!


Introduction to Consecutive Integers - Algebra I


Consecutive Integers and Word Problems (Sum of Consecutive Integers) - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to find a pair of consecutive integers by using word problems. Consecutive integers are integers that follow each other in a patterned order. For each word problem, you will set up the problem based on how many integers you are looking for. The first integer will always be a variable, the others following in a specified patterned order. To learn more, watch the video, hit like, and subscribe for more!


Consecutive Integers and Word Problems (Sum of Consecutive Integers) - Algebra I

Saturday, December 12, 2015

Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn about the quadratic formula and the discriminant. The discriminant is the value that determines how many solutions and the type of solutions that a quadratic equation has. The quadratic formula is a method for solving a quadratic equation. In the quadratic formula, there is a part under the radical, which is b^2-4ac. This part of the formula is what's used to find the value of the discriminant. The first step is to put your quadratic equation into ax^2+bx+c form. Next, you identify the values of a, b, and c. Now you will substitute these values into b^2-4ac to find the discriminant. If the value is positive, there are 2 real solutions. If the value is negative, then there are 2 complex solutions. If the value is equal to 0, then there is one real solution.


Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant - Algebra I

Solving Quadratic Equations using Factoring - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to solve a quadratic equation using factoring. A quadratic equation is always in the form of ax^2+bx+c. The x^2 term is what makes an equation quadratic. There are several methods to solve a quadratic equation, one of which is called factoring. When factoring to solve a quadratic equation, you first put the equation into ax^2+bx+c form, and then factor to get two binomials. Set each binomial equal to zero, and the numbers you get as a result of solving, will be your solutions to the quadratic equation.


Solving Quadratic Equations using Factoring - Algebra I

Solving Systems of Linear Inequalities - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to solve a system of linear inequalities. Linear inequalities have the symbols of greater than, less than, greater than or equal to, and less than or equal to. When you are solving a system of linear inequalities, you solving for the variables. Since these are inequalities, you won't get an exact answer, but you get a range of the solutions. Once you have gotten that, you will shade based upon the symbol in the inequality. The shaded part that overlaps both lines in the solution of the inequality. Any point within that shaded area will make the inequalities true.


Solving Systems of Linear Inequalities - Algebra I

Sunday, November 8, 2015

Compound Inequalities - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to solve compound inequalities. An inequality is determined by the symbols greater than, less than, greater than or equal to, and less than or equal to. A compound inequality can be an 'and' compound inequality, or an 'or' compound inequality. In an 'and' compound inequality, the two point son the number line, which represent the solutions to each of the inequalities, are shaded so that the solution of the entire compound inequality is within both points. To solve for the solution, you simply use inverse operations. Solving an inequality is similar to solving an equation, except you don't get an exact solution. To learn more, watch the following video for step by step instructions.


How to Solve Compound Inequalities - Algebra I

Multi-Step Inequalities - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to solve multi-step inequalities. An inequality is determined by the symbols for greater than, less than, greater than or equal to, and less than or equal too. When you have a multi-step inequality, it means that it will require multiple inverse operations to solve for the variable. It is similar to solving multi-step equations, but instead of getting a solid number for the value of the variable, you will get a range. For example, if your solution is 4 and there is a less than symbol, it means that the value of the variable can be any number less than 4. To learn more, please watch the video, and hit subscribe for more content weekly!


How to solve Multi Step Inequalities - Algebra I


Solving One-Step Equations - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to solve a one step equation. An equation is two mathematical expressions that are equal to one another. When solving a one step equation, you are solving for the value of the variable. A variable is an unknown value in math that is substituted by a lower case letter, often x. In order to find the value of the variable, you must isolate the variable, or in other words get it by itself. To do this, you must use inverse operations. Inverse Operations are opposite operations. The inverse pairs are addition and subtraction & multiplication and division.


How to Solve Single/One Step Equation - Algebra I


Monday, September 28, 2015

Subtracting Polynomials- Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to subtract polynomials. A polynomial has one or more terms. When subtracting polynomials, you distribute the negative 1 to each of the terms in the second polynomial and then change the subtraction sign into an addition sign. Then you simply add by combining like terms.


Subtracting Polynomials- Algebra I

GCF of Polynomials - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to find the GCF or the Greatest Common Factor of polynomials. To find the GCF, you need to first find the greatest common factor of the constants or numbers, and the greatest common factor of the variables. Then multiply the two to get the GCF of the entire polynomial.


GCF of Polynomials - Algebra I

Factoring Out A Monomial - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to factor out a monomial. A monomial is a single term. When you have to factor out a monomial, you are simply finding the GCF or greatest common factor of the term, and then dividing by the GCF, to get a simplified, factorized answer. You write the GCF and then in parenthesis you write the factorization solution.


Factoring Out A Monomial - Algebra I

Multiply a Binomial by a Trinomial - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to multiply a binomial by a trinomial. A binomial consists of two terms and a trinomial consists of three terms. When you multiply a binomial by a trinomial, you distribute the first term of the binomial to all three terms of the trinomial, and then you distribute the second term of the binomial to the three terms as well. Then you just simply combine all like terms, and you have your product.



Multiply a Binomial by a Trinomial - Algebra I

Product of a Sum and Difference - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to find the product of a sum and a difference. A sum and difference is simply whether the operation in a binomial is addition or subtraction. Addition is a sum and subtraction is a difference. When you multiply them, you use the FOIL method, which is simply distributing the first term of the first binomial to the two terms in the second binomial, and then repeating with the second term of the first term. Finally you combine all like terms, and you have your product of a sum and a difference.



Product of a Sum and Difference - Algebra I

Factoring x²+bx+c When b is greater than 0 and c is also greater than 0 - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor the standard form of a polynomial, which is x^2+bx+c, when the value of b is greater than 0 and value of c is greater than 0. When factoring a polynomial, you are looking for a factor pair of the value of c, that when you add them you get the value of b. When factored, you will have two binomial, or a pair of binomials which when multiplied, gives you the original polynomial.


Factoring x²+bx+c When b is greater than 0 and c is also greater than 0 - Algebra I

Factoring x²+bx+ c When b is less than 0 and c is greater than 0 - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor a polynomial in standard form, which is x^2+bx+c. When factoring a polynomial, you are looking for a factor pair of the value of c, that when you add them you get the value of b. When factored, you will have two binomial, or a pair of binomials which when multiplied, gives you the original polynomial.


Factoring x²+bx+ c When b is less than 0 and c is greater than 0  - Algebra I

Factoring x²+bx+c When value of C is less than 0 - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor x^2+bx+c when the value of c is less than 0. When you factor a polynomial, you find a factor pair of the value of c that when when you add the two numbers in the factor pair, you get the value of b. You write those values in the two binomials that are the result of factoring.


Factoring x²+bx+c When value of C is less than 0 - Algebra I

Applying Factoring Trinomials - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to apply factoring trinomials to word problems. A trinomial is type of polynomial that consists of three terms. In this word problem, you have to find the possible dimensions of a rectangle whose area is equal to a trinomial. So, to find the dimensions, you will factor the trinomial.


Applying Factoring Trinomials - Algebra I

Factoring a Trinomial with Two Variables - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor a trinomial with two variables. When you factor, you are looking for a factor pair of the value of c that when you add the numbers you get the value of b. Once you have those numbers, you simply write the binomials and then add the second variable at the end with the number. To learn more in detail, watch the video!


Factoring a Trinomial with Two Variables - Algebra I

How to Square a Binomial - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to square a binomial. A binomial consists of two terms. When you square a binomial, you multiply the binomial by itself. You do this by using the distributive property. First multiply the first terms of each binomial, then the outer terms, then the inside terms, and then the last terms. Finally, combine the like terms, and there you have your answer. This method used for binomials is also called the FOIL Method.


How to Square a Binomial - Algebra I

Factoring ax²+bx+c, When ac is positive - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor ax²+bx+c when the value of ac is positive. First, you determine the values of a, b, c, and ac. Then you find a factor pair of ac that when you add them you get the value of b. Once you have your binomials, divide the constants in the binomials by the a value to get your final answer. If the constant doesn't divide evenly into the a term, then multiply the a by the variable and let the constant be as it is.


Factoring ax²+bx+c, When ac is positive - Algebra I

How to Factor a Difference of Two Squares - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor a difference of two squares. When you have a difference of two squares, you have a binomial that you have to write in the form of a²- b². Then you simply write as (a+b) (a-b). When you multiply these, you should be able to get the original binomial.


How to Factor a Difference of Two Squares - Algebra I

Factoring ax²+bx+c when ac is Negative - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor ax²+bx+c when ac is negative. When you multiply the value of a and the value of c, you get ac. To factor a polynomial is this form, you temporarily remove the a terms, and replace the c term with the ac term so that the polynomial is now in standard form. Standard form of a polynomial is x²+bx+c. After you have this form, you simply factor the two binomials. Now you bring back the a term and divide the constant of the binomials by the a. If the constant divides evenly, you write the quotient in place of the constant. If it doesn't divide evenly, then you bring the a term up and multiply it by the variable and leave the constant of the binomial as it is.


Factoring ax²+bx+c when ac is Negative - Algebra I

Factoring out a Common Factor - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor out a common factor in a polynomial by using what is called factoring by grouping. When a polynomial has four terms, you can factor it by putting parenthesis around the first two terms and the last tow terms. Then you find the GCF or greatest common factor of each binomial. Then, divide the binomial by the GCF to factor. You should get the same binomial in the parenthesis after finding the GCF of each binomial and dividing. Next, just write the common binomial in one set of parenthesis and the two GCFs in the second set of parenthesis. The sign between the GCFs in the binomial are determined by the sign of the third term in the polynomial.


How to Factoring out a Common Factor - Algebra I

Factoring a Perfect Square Trinomial - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to factor a perfect square trinomial. When factoring a perfect square trinomial, you first need to identify whether the trinomial is a perfect square trinomial. You can do this by determining whether the first and last terms are perfect squares. If they are, then it is a perfect square trinomial. Next, find the square root of the first term. This is the first term in your binomial. Then determine the square root of your last term which will be the second term in your binomial. The sign is determined by the sign of the second term of the trinomial. Once you have your binomial, put parenthesis around it and put it to the second power, or square it. So the result of factoring a perfect square trinomial is a square of a binomial. That means that is you square the binomial, you will get that perfect square trinomial. The two forms of the perfect square trinomials are a²+2ab+b² and a²-2ab+b². To learn more about this topic, watch the video!



Factoring a Perfect Square Trinomial - Algebra I

Monday, September 21, 2015

Multiplying A Monomial and A Trinomial - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to multiply a monomial by a trinomial. A monomial is a single term whereas a trinomial is three terms. When you multiply a monomial and a trinomial, you are simply distributing the monomial to each of the terms in the trinomial. The product that you get is your final answer. When you distribute, you are actually applying the distributive property.


How to Multiplying A Monomial and A Trinomial - Algebra I


What is a Polynomial - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn about a POLYNOMIAL.
A Polynomial is a mathematical expression that contains one or more terms. A polynomial could be further classified as a monomial, binomial, trinomial, and if more than three terms are present, than simply polynomial will be used. You will be shown an example of a polynomial and will also learn about the standard form of a polynomial, which is further explained in another video.


What is a Polynomial - Algebra I

What is a Mononomial - Algebra I

Expression Definition: A mathematical phrase that has terms that can be constants, variables, operators and exponents.
Lets say we have expression
100+x-3xy+y/3+9x^2y^3


Monomial: A single term that can be
A Real number such as 2,-3, 100,2.5,2/3
A Variable such as x,y,z
A product of Real number and a variable or variables with whole number exponents
such as 4x,,4xy, 9x^2, 9xy^3, x/4


What is MonoNomial in Math - Algebra I

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Adding Polynomials - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to add polynomial. A  polynomial is a mathematical phrase that includes more than one term. There are two methods to add polynomial. First is to add horizontally and ten second is to add vertically. When you add horizontally, you put a parenthesis around each polynomial and put a plus sign in the middle. Then you simply combine like terms. When you add vertically, you line up the terms on top of each other so that the like terms are lined up. Then you combine the like terms. To learn more, watch this video!



How to add Polynomials- Algebra I

Classifying Polynomials - Algebra I

In this video, you will learn how to classify a polynomial. A polynomial can be classified within two categories. The first category is based on the number of terms, and the second is based on the name using the degree of the polynomial. A polynomial is a mathematical phrase that includes more than one term. The degree of a polynomial is the sum of the exponents of the greatest term. Polynomial can be monomials, binomial, or trinomials. A polynomial can also be a constant, linear, cubic, quadratic, or fourth degree.


How to Classify Polynomial - Algebra I

Standard Form of a Polynomial - Algebra I

The standard form of a polynomial is when you write the polynomial in order of the term with the greatest exponent down to the term with the least exponent. In this video, you will learn how to write the standard form of several polynomials. A polynomial is a mathematical phrase with more than one term. The prefix 'poly' means more than one. To learn more, please watch this algebra video.



How to write Polynomial in Standard form- Algebra I

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

What is the Degree of a Monomial - Algebra I

The degree of a monomial is the sum of the exponents of its variables. The degree of a non-zero constant is 0. Zero has no degree.

A monomial is a real number, a variable, or a product of a real number and one or more variables with whole-number exponents.

Examples:
5x has a degree of 1. 5x = 5x^1 so the exponent is 1
6x^2y^3 has a degree of 5. The exponents are 2 and 3. Their sum is 5.
4 has a degree of 0. 4 = 4x^0. The degree of a nonzero constant is zero.


What is the Degree of a Monomial - Algebra I

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Solving Systems of Equations by Elimination - Algebra I

In Algebra I video tutorial series, this video is about Solving System of Equations by Elimination. The video has two examples to show you how to Solve System of Equations by Elimination.


How to Solve a system of equations using elimination - Algebra I

Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities - Algebra I

In this video you will learn about absolute value equations and inequalities. Absolute value is the distance of a number from zero. The symbol is two vertical lines around the number(s) like these: | |
An absolute value equation is enclosed with this symbol. An equation is a mathematical phrase which includes an equal sign. Absolute value inequalities are also enclosed within the same symbol. An inequality is a mathematical phrase which says that values are not equal. Absolute value equations and inequalities must be solved twice but using different methods.

How to Solve Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities - Algebra I

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Solving Inequalities with Multiplication or Division - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to solve inequalities with multiplication or division.  To solve an inequality using multiplication or division means to simply use inverse operations only including multiplication and division. Inverse operations are what lead to the solution of an inequality. The solution of an inequality doesn't give the exact value of the variable since you don't use equal signs in inequalities. There are four symbols that are used in inequalities: greater than, less than, greater than or equal to, and less than or equal to. Watch the following video for more details on this topic.

How to Solve Inequalities with Multiplication or Division - Algebra 1

Saturday, August 22, 2015

Linear Functions and Patterns - Algebra I

In this video you will learn about linear functions and patterns. A linear function is also known as a linear equation which is an equation that has a graph of a non vertical line or part of a non vertical line. A function is a relationship that pairs each input value with exactly one output value. An input value of a function is known as the independent variable which is always graphed on the x-axis. An output value of a function is known as the dependent variable which is always graphed on the y-axis. To learn more about this topic, please watch the following algebra video.


What are Linear Functions - Algebra 1

Using Graphs to Relate Two Quantities - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to use graphs to relate two quantities. Two important key words that you need to know for this topic are independent variable and dependent variable. Independent variable is the input value of a function and is always graphed on the x-axis. The dependent variable is always graphed on the y-axis and is the output value of a function. The example provided in this video is a word problem in which you have to identify the independent and dependent variable. Then you have to describe how to graph relates to both quantities. For more details on this topic, please watch the following algebra video.

Using Graphs to Related Two Quantities - Algebra 1

What are Compound Inequalities - Algebra I

In this video you will learn about compound inequalities. A compound inequality is a combination of two or more inequalities that are joined by the word 'and' or the word 'or'. This means that there are two types of compound inequalities and therefore two different ways to graph. For an 'and' compound inequality, you have to find a solution that makes both inequalities true. For an 'or' inequality, the solution has to make one or the other true. To graph an 'and' compound inequality, the graph connects both points, whereas in an 'or compound inequality, the points take off in different directions in most questions in algebra I.


What are Compound Inequalities - Algebra 1

Solving Inequalities with Addition or Subtraction - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to solve inequalities with addition or subtraction. To solve with addition or subtraction means that in order to find the solution of the inequality you only have to add or subtract. Inverse operations are the opposite operations which help to find the solution. Since the inverse of addition is subtractions, that means the inverse of subtraction is addition! Therefore, just these two operations can solve an inequality in this topic.


How to Solve Inequalities with Addition or Subtractions Operations - Algebra 1

Introduction to Inequalities - Algebra I

In this video we will be doing a small introduction to inequalities. An inequality says that two values are not equal. In this video we will cover the definition of an inequality, the symbols that are used in an inequality, and how to write and compare inequalities. The symbols for inequalities are greater than, less than, greater than or equal to, and less than or equal to. In order to write an inequality, you must use at least one of these symbols. Inequalities could have more than one symbol. For more detail, please watch the following video in our algebra unit.


What are Inequalities in Math - Algebra 1

Thursday, August 20, 2015

How to Solve Equations with Variables on Both Sides - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to solve an equation with variables on both sides. The first step is to combine like terms. Then use inverse operations to eliminate the values that are being added, subtracted, etc. to the variable. Inverse operations are opposite operations. The inverse of addition is subtraction and the inverse of multiplication is division. Equations with variables on both sides often have the same variable which you have to find the value of. Otherwise, if there are two different variables, solve for the given variable.


How to Solve Equations with Variables on Both Sides - Algebra 1

How to Solve Literal Equations - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to solve literal equations. Literal Equations are equations that include more than one variable and you have to solve for one specific variable. In literal equations, when you solve for a variable you are just trying to isolate that variable. A solution to a literal equation could be x = b + 7. So you don't exactly get the value of the variable, just a solution. To isolate the variable, you have to get rid of anything that is being added, subtracted, etc. to the target variable. You do this by using inverse operations.


How to Solve Literal Equations - Algebra 1

Solving Multi Step Equations - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to solve multi step equations. An equation is a mathematical phrase which includes an equal sign. In a multi step equation, you are solving for the variable. The variable is a lower case letter which is used to replace an unknown value in mathematics. In order to solve the multi step equations, you must use inverse operations. The inverse of adding is subtracting and the inverse of multiplying is dividing. A multi step equation takes more than two steps two find the solution. The solution is the value of the variable.


How to Solve Multi Step Equations - Algebra 1

How to Solve Two Step Equations - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to solve two step equations. An equation is a mathematical phrase which shows that two values are equal. A two step equation is an equation which takes to steps to solve for the variable. The variable is an unknown value in math which is replaced by a lower case letter. Inverse operations are when you do the opposite of an operation to eliminate and get the value of the variable. The inverse of addition is subtraction and the inverse of multiplication id division. To learn more, watch the following algebra I video.


How to Solve Two Step Equations - Algebra 1

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Intro to Equations - Algebra I

In this video we will be covering an introduction to equations. An equation is a mathematical phrase which uses an equal sign to connect two expressions. This video will cover three parts of equations, which are classifying equations, writing equations from words, and identifying solutions for equations. An equation can be classified as either true, false, or open. Writing equations from words is the same as translating word statements into equations. To identify a solution of an equation you must plug in the given value into the variable and solve to see if the solution works.


Introduction to Equations - Algebra 1

Convert Word Statements into Algebraic Expressions - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to convert verbal expressions or word statements into algebraic expressions. When you are given word statements and are asked to convert into an algebraic expressions, you are simply writing an expressions. An expression is a mathematical phrase or sentence that consists of variables and operations. Converting a word statement to an expression is very simple. Watch the following video to learn more.

Translate Word Statements into Algebraic Expressions - Algebra I

Simplify Expressions using Distributive Property - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to simplify an expression using the distributive property. An expression in a mathematical phrase which includes variables, operators, and numbers. In the Distributive Property, you distribute a single outer term to two or more terms within the parenthesis. This math tutorial will show you several examples of expressions and how to simplify them using the Distributive Property.

How to Simplify Expressions by using Distributive Property - Algebra 1

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Properties of Real Numbers - Algebra I

In this video you will learn about the properties of real numbers. The properties of real numbers are 
Commutative Property of addition and multiplication
Associative Property of addition and multiplication
Identity Property and the zero property.
Zero property only applies to multiplication and multiplication also has a property of negative one. Watch the following video to learn more.


Properties of Real Numbers - Algebra I

Order of Operations and Evaluation of Expressions - Algebra I

In this video you will learn how to apply the order of operations in the evaluation of expressions. The order of operations can be simplified down to one word: PEMDAS.
P: Parenthesis
E: Exponents
M: Multiplication
D: Division
A: Addition
S: Subtraction

When evaluating an expressions, you are simplifying it. Inverse operations is also another important concept in the evaluation of expressions. Inverse operations are just the opposite operations. The opposite of addition is subtraction and opposite of multiplication is division.

Order of Operations and Evaluation of Expressions - Algebra 1

Variables and Expressions - Algebra I

In this video you will learn about variables and expressions. A variable is a lower case letter that is used to represent an unknown value in mathematics. An expressions is a mathematical statement which consists of variables and numeric operations. An expression can only be simplified and not solved unless the value of a variable is given to you. This is the first topic in our algebra unit and outlines the basics of algebraic expressions and equations.


Variables and Expressions - Algebra 1

Volume of Cone - 7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the volume of a cone. Volume is the total capacity that a three dimensional shape can hold. A cone is a three dimensional shape. The formula for finding the volume of a cone is 1/3 x pi x radius squared x height. Watch the 7th grade math video for more on this topic.


Volume of Cone = 1/3(π × r2×h)


Volume of Cone - 7th Grade Math

Volume of Pyramid - 7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the volume of a pyramid. Volume is the amount of capacity a three dimensional shape can hold. A pyramid is a 3D shape. This 7th grade math video will teach you how to find the volume with step by step instructions.

The formula for volume of Pyramid is

Volume = 1/3 ( LxWxH)


Volume of Pyramid - 7th Grade Math

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Surface Area of a Cylinder - 7th Grade Math


 
In this video you will learn how to find the surface area of a cylinder. A cylinder is a three dimensional shape. To find the surface area of a cylinder, use the formula 2 x pi x radius x height + 2 x pi x radius squared. Radius the value of the circle that stretches from the center of the circle to any end. Pi has an approximate value of 3.14.




  
 
Surface Area of a Cylinder - 7th Grade Math

Surface Area of a Pyramid - 7th Grade Math


In this video you will learn how to find the surface area of a pyramid. Surface is the total area of a three dimensional shape. A pyramid is  3D shape consisting of triangles and a rectangular base ( sometimes square base). The formula is to find the area of the 2D shapes within the 3D shape ad add to find the surface area.



Surface Area of a Pyramid - 7th Grade Math

Area of Irregular Shapes -7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the area of irregular shapes. An irregular shape consists of regular shapes within the irregular shape. The method is to first find the separate areas of the regular shapes and the add together to find the total area. Watch the 7th grade math video to learn more.




Area of Irregular Shapes -7th Grade Math

Area of Circle - 7th Grade Math

A circle is a 2 dimensional plane shape that has no sides and no angles. Remember that a circle is not a polygon. To find the area of a circle you need to multiply pi times the radius squared. If you know only the diameter then the formula is pi divided by 4 times the diameter squared. Or when you know only the circumference the formula is circumference squared divided by 4 times diameter. In this video we have provided all the types of formulas to find the area of a circle using different examples. For further details watch the following video.






Area of Circle - 7th Grade Math





Friday, August 7, 2015

Volume of a Sphere - 7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the volume of a sphere. the volume is how much capacity a three dimensional object can hold. A sphere is a three dimensional shape. The formula for volume of a sphere is 4/3 x pi x radius cubed. Watch the above 7th grade math video to learn more.





Volume of a Sphere - 7th Grade Math

Surface Area of Prisms - 7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the surface area of a rectangular prism and a triangular prism. Surface area is the total area of the two dimensional shapes which make up a three dimensional shape. The formula for finding the surface area of a rectangular prism and a triangular prism is to first find the area of the two-dimensional shapes and then add to find the surface area.
Check out the video below for more indormation...




Surface Area of Prisms - 7th Grade Math

Surface Area of a Sphere - 7th Grade Math

 In this video you will learn how to find the surface area of a sphere. A sphere is a three dimensional shape. Surface area is the total area of a three dimensional object.
The formula for finding the surface are of a a sphere is 4 x pi x radius squared. The radius is the line that stretches form the center of the sphere to any end of the sphere.
Check out the video below for more information...

Surface Area of Sphere =4π



Surface Area of a Sphere - 7th Grade Math

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Volume of a Rectangular Prism - 7th Grade Math

In this video, you will learn how to find the volume of a rectangular prism. Volume is how much space a three dimensional shape occupies. You will learn how to find the volume using the formula LxWxH. Length multiplied by width multiplied by height. A rectangular prism is a three dimensional shape which has 6 faces, 8 vertices, and 12 edges.



Volume of a Rectangular Prism - 7th Grade Math

Area of Triangles - 7th Grade Math

This video explains how to find the area of triangles. The formula for finding the area of any triangle is 1/2xBxH. That means you have to multiply the base by the height and divide by two to get the area. The formula is the same for all types of triangles. Learn how to use the formula for area of triangle to calculate the area of the triangle shown in the example in the video.


Area of Triangles - 7th Grade Math

Volume of Cube - 7th Grade Math

In this video, You will learn how to find the Volume of Cube.
Cube Definition:
A cube is three dimensional shape which has all the sides such as length, height and width same in measurement.

To find the Volume of a cube, follow the formula which is L x W x H.
L stands for length.
W stands for width.
H stands for height.
In a cube all of the sides are of the same measurement and so we will multiply the same measurement three times.





Volume of Cube - 7th Grade Math

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Area of Parallelogram -7th Grade Math

Topic:Learn how to find the Area of Parallelogram

Parallelogram Definition:
Parallelogram is a flat shape with opposite sides parallel and equal in length.

To find the Area of Parallelogram, we have to multiple Base with Height, so our Formula will be

Area of Parallelogram= Base X Height
A=BXH



How to Find Area of Parallelogram - 7th Grade Math

Area of Trapezoids -7th Grade Math

Learn How to Find the Area of Trapezoid.

Definition of Trapezoid:
Trapezoid is a four sided flat shape with straight sides that has a pair of opposite sides parallel

To find the area of Trapezoid, we have to add the two bases and then divide by 2 and then Multiply with Height of Trapezoid.

Formula for Area of Trapezoid =((Base1+ Base2)/2) X Height


How to Find Area of Trapezoid Shape -7th Grade Math Tutorial

Find the Perimeter of Polygon -7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the Perimeter of Polygon shapes.




How to find Perimeter of Polygon shapes -7th Grade Math

8th-Grade Math

Number System

  1. Estimating the Value of Expressions
  2. Rational Numbers
  3. Irrational Numbers
  4. Comparing and Ordering Rational and Irrational Numbers

Expressions and Equations

  1. Exponents
  2. What is Scientific Notation
  3. One Step Linear Equations
  4. One Step Linear Equations Word Problems
  5. How to Solve Non-Linear One Step Linear Equations
  6. How to Graph Equations
  7. Slope 
  8. Slope-Intercept Form
  9. Proportional Relationships
  10. Comparing Proportions
  11. How to Solve Systems of Equations using Graphs
  12. How to Solve Systems of Equations using Substitution
  13. Solving Systems of Equations using Linear Combination
  14. How to Solve Word problems using System of Equations

Functions

  1. Functions
  2. Linear and Non-Linear Functions
  3. How to Compare Functions
  4. How to Apply Functions

Geometry

  1. Pythagorean Theorem in Two Dimensions
  2. How to use the Pythagorean Theorem
  3. Pythagorean Theorem in Three Dimensions
  4. Volume
  5. How to Coordinate Geometry
  6.  What are Transformations
  7. Properties of Transformations
  8. What are Congruent Figures
  9. What are Similar Figures
  10. Angles

Statistics and Probability

  1. What are Scatter Plots
  2. What are Trend Lines
  3. Interpreting Linear Models
  4. What are Two-Way Tables


Sunday, June 14, 2015

7th Grade Math - Types of Triangles

There are 6 basic types of triangles which are distributed into 2 different categories.
The first category is based upon measurement of angles. These triangles are Right triangle, Acute triangle, and Obtuse triangle.

The second category includes the triangles based on the measurements of their sides. These triangles are called Equilateral triangle, Isosceles triangle, and Scalene triangle. Here is a description of each of the triangles:

Right Triangle: One angle of exactly 90 degrees.
Acute Triangle: All three angles are less than 90 degrees.
Obtuse Triangle: Only one angle is more than 90 degrees.
Equilateral Triangle: All of the sides are of equal measurement.
Isosceles Triangle: Two of the sides are the same in measurement.
Scalene Triangle: All of the sides are of different measurement.




Types of Triangles -7th Grade Math

7th Grade Math - Vertical angles

Vertical Angles are two pairs of opposite angles made when two lines intersect. These two angles are same in measurement. So knowing this you can find the measurement of one of the angles using the measurement you already know. Also in total 4 angles are formed in vertical angles. For more details watch the video below.



What are Vertical Angles - 7th Grade Math

What are Corresponding Angles -7th Grade Math

Corresponding angles are angles that are in the same location at each intersection of lines. For example, let's say that a pair of parallel lines are being intersected by a transversal line. The two angles on the same location for each intersection will be known as corresponding angles. Also if the two lines are parallel then the corresponding angles will be of the same measurement.



What are Corresponding Angles -7th Grade Math

7th Grade Math - Circumference of a Circle

Circumference is the measurement of the outer boundary of a geometric figure, especially a circle. In order to calculate the circumference of a circle, you have to use the formula C = 2(pi)r in which C stands for circumference is equal to 2 times the value of pi times the radius. Once you have all of the values, you can simply substitute to find the circumference. In the following video, you will learn in complete detail how to calculate the circumference of a circle using various examples.



Circumference of Circle- 7th Grade Math

7th Grade Math - Area of Rectangle

In order to find the area of a rectangle, you simply multiply the length times the width. When it comes to seventh grade math however, we use expressions for the measurement rather than simple numbers. The formula stays the same. Once you have multiplied the length by the width, you substitute the value of the variable and calculate your final perimeter. Watch the following video for a more detailed explanation.


How to Find Area of Rectangle - 7th Grade Math

Saturday, June 13, 2015

7th Grade Math - Supplementary Angles

Supplementary angles are two angles that will always add up to 180  degrees. Let's say that we have an acute angle that is 80 degrees and an obtuse angle which is 100 degrees. If we add the two angles together, we get a supplementary angle. Therefore, supplementary angles are very easy to understand. For more details about supplementary angles, please watch the following video.



What are Supplementary Angles - 7th Grade Math

7th Grade Math - Types of Angles

There are 3 basic types of angles which are the following:

  1. Right angle
  2. Acute angle
  3. Obtuse angle


A right angle is exactly 90 degrees in measurement.
An acute angle is less than 90 degrees.
An obtuse angle is more than 90 degrees.

There is also a straight angle which is exactly 180 degrees, no more no less is measurement. The following video gives a further detailed explanation of the types of angles.



7th Grade Math - Types of Angles

Monday, May 4, 2015

Perimeter of Square -7th Grade Math

Square is two dimensional shape. Perimeter is distance around a two dimensional shape. Let's consider the length of a side of a square is variable "a". As four sides of square are always equal so we can write our formula for Perimeter as given below

Perimeter of Square = a+a+a+a

OR simply

Perimeter of Square =4a



How to Find Perimeter of a Square - 7th Grade Math 

Thursday, April 23, 2015

What are Congruent Angles - 7th Grade Math



Congruent Angles are the angles which are equal in measurement either you measure in degrees or radians.
The lines which create these angles can be any length.  Also they don’t have to point in same direction.
As long as the two angles are equal in measurement they are congruent Angles.




What are Congruent Angles - 7th Grade Math

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

What are Complementary Angles - 7th Grade Math

Let's say you have two angles, each one is 45 degree. If you add them up and the sum is 90 degree then those angles are Complementary angles.

Consider few more examples

70 degree and 20 degree
35 degree and 55 degree
10 degree and 80 degree

all above are Complementary angles as the sum of both is equal to 90 degree or right angle.




What are Complementary Angles - 7th Grade Math

Monday, April 20, 2015

Alternate Interior Angles - 7th Grade Math

Before we go for the definition of Alternate Interior Angles, let's define Transversal line.

Transversal line is a line that crosses at least two other lines. As we know the definition of Transversal line now. Let's consider we have two lines and they are crossed by a line ( Transversal line).

The angles on opposite side of transveral line and also inside of two lines which are crossed by Transveral line are called Alternate Interior Angles. 




Alternate Interior Angles - 7th Grade Math




Friday, April 17, 2015

Alternate Exterior Angles - 7th Grade Math

Before we go for the definition of Alternate Exterior Angles, let's define Transversal line.

Transversal line is a line that crosses at least two other lines. As we know the definition of Transversal line now. Let's consider we have two lines and they are crossed by a line ( Transversal line).

The angles on opposite side of transveral line and also outside of two lines which are crossed by Transveral line are called Alternate Exterior Angles.




Alternate Exterior Angles - 7th Grade Math

Thursday, April 16, 2015

What are Adjacent Angles - 7th Grade Math

Adjacent Angles are the angles which have the common vertex and common side. Watch the video to see how exactly the Adjacent Angles looks when you draw them.



What are Adjacent Angles - 7th Grade Math

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Percent Problems - Finding the Percent | 7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the percent in a percent problem. This is the third video on the three types of percent problems. The best way is to set up a proportion and then cross multiplication to find the Percent. Please watch video for step by step solution with multiple examples.


Percent Problems - Finding the Percent | 7th Grade Math



Percent Problems - Finding the Whole | 7th Grade Math

In this video you will learn how to find the whole in a percent problem. This is the second video on solving types of percent problems. The best and simplest way is by setting up a proportion. Please watch video for step by step solution with multiple examples.


Percent Problems - Finding the Whole | 7th Grade Math

Percent Problems - Finding the Part | 7th Grade Math

In this video, you will learn how to find the part in a percent problem. This is one of the three types of percent problems. The easiest way to find the part is by setting up a proportion and then doing cross multiplication. A proportion is two fractions that are equal to each other.


Finding the Part - Percent Problems

Convert Percent to Decimal - 7th Grade Math

In this video, you will learn how to convert percents into decimals. First rewrite percent as a fraction. Next divide the numerator by the denominator. You will get a quotient which is a fraction. Please watch the video learn with examples.



Convert Percent to Decimal - 7th Grade Math

Convert Fractions into Percents - 7th Grade Math

In this video, you will learn how to convert fractions into percents. To convert fractions into percents, multiply the denominator by a number to get 100. Multiply the same number with the numerator. Otherwise, multiply the fraction by 100/1 and simplify.



Convert Fractions into Percents - 7th Grade Math

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

How to convert Percent to Fraction - 7th Grade Math

In this video, you will learn how to convert a percent into a fraction. A percent is a number out of 100. To change a percent into a fraction, write the number with a denominator of 100. Then simplify and you have your fraction.



Convert Percent to Fraction in Math

Converting Decimals into Fractions - 7th Grade Math

In this video, you will learn how to convert decimals into fractions. In order to convert a decimal into a fraction simply replace the decimal point with a 1 and add zeroes depending upon the number of digits in the decimal. This will be your denominator. The numerator will simply be the number.


How to Convert Decimals to Fractions in Math

Friday, February 20, 2015

7th Grade Math - Solve Proportion by Cross Production Method

In this video, you will learn how to solve proportions using the cross production method. Cross products is when you multiply diagonally and the products you get must be the exact same for it to be a proportion. Proportion is an equation that says two ratios are equivalent.


Solve Proportion by Cross Production Method

7th Grade Math - Solve Proportions by using Equivalent Fractions

In this video, you will learn how to solve proportions by using equivalent fractions. Equivalent fractions are fractions that are equal to each other. Proportion is an equation that says two ratios are equivalent.


Solve Proportions by using Equivalent Fraction Method

7th Grade Math - Word Problem for Proportions

In this video you will learn how to solve a proportion through word problems. You will be able to learn how to setup a proportion and also solve for a missing value, or a variable. Proportions are equations that say two ratios are equivalent.



Solve Proportion Word Problem

7th Grade Math - What are Proportions

In this video you will learn about proportions. Proportion is a equation that says two ratios or fractions are equivalent. This video will talk about setting up a proportion and also how to find a missing value through setting up proportions.


What are Proportions in Math

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

7th Grade Math - Unit Rate Word Problem

In this video you will learn the difference between Rate and Unit Rate. You will learn how to solve word problems dealing with unit rate. In the problem you will also find unit rate. This video is a complete walk through of unit rate so it is good for people who don't know it and want to learn it.


Rate and Unit Rate

7th Grade Math - Rate and Unit Rate

In this video you will learn about rates and unit rates. Rates are ratios that have two quantities and are measured in different units. Unit rates must have a denominator of one and are simply per 'unit'.



Rate and Unit Rate

7th Grade Math - Word Problem for Equivalent Ratios

In this video you will learn about equivalent ratios through word problems. Equivalent ratios are just ratios that are equal to one another. Ratios are just a comparison between two numbers.


Equivalent Ratios Word Problem

7th Grade Math - Compare Ratios by using Word Problem

In this video you will learn how to compare ratios using word problems. A ratio is a comparison between two numbers. When comparing two ratios you are simply trying to find out whether the are equal to one another.

Compare Ratios in Word Problem